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About Amble

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This sleepy coastal town on Britain’s north Northumberland coast is famed for its breathtaking scenery, wildlife, small fishing boats, independent shops and history.

During the nineteenth century, Amble developed as a port serving the coal mines of neighbouring Northumbrian villages. Fishing also played its part in the economy of the town, and many locals are still related to the original fishing families, although the fleet is now much reduced.

Nowadays, visitors hire boats out of the harbour for fishing expeditions or take a Puffin Cruise to see the famous Roseate terns, puffins and seals on RSPB-maintained Coquet Island, about a mile offshore. We are also home to a beautiful Marina which welcomes visitors from all around the UK, as well as our continental cousins  from across the North Sea.

The 2018 festival will be held on 26 – 28 May 2018

ambleAmble is a haven for bird watchers, walkers, cyclists and those seeking a breath of fresh air. The town is a stone’s throw from medieval castles, nature reserves, long golden beaches and is gateway to the majestic hills of Coquetdale, historic town of Alnwick and all the wide open splendour Northumberland can offer.

 

We’re family and dog friendly, and if the weather is inclement, we have a large indoor play centre for children. There is a luxury swimming pool, sauna and gym facilities at The Granary Leisure Complex and a funfair and indoor amusement arcade.

Our main shopping street is Queen Street, which boasts more independent shops than any other small local town. Here you will find good quality produce, competitive prices and our famous friendly welcome.

 

Also known as “Amble By The Sea” and “The Friendliest Port“, we have plenty of comfortable bed and breakfast accommodation, cosy holiday cottages, good quality restaurants, and welcoming bars and cafés.